UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Powered By Google Custom Search Vintage Radio and TV Service Data

Go Back   UK Vintage Radio Repair and Restoration Discussion Forum > Specific Vintage Equipment > Vintage Audio (record players, hi-fi etc)

Notices

Vintage Audio (record players, hi-fi etc) Amplifiers, speakers, gramophones and other audio equipment.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 11th Nov 2022, 1:54 pm   #1
jonnie_m
Diode
 
Join Date: Sep 2022
Location: Lancaster, Lancashire, UK.
Posts: 9
Default BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Hi all
I've been helping my dad clear out a load of old audio gear, amongst which are some BBC LS2/1/121 wedge shaped monitors. I've found nothing about them on the web, certainly no pictures, so I thought I'd share some pictures here. Apparantly they were used as monitors in BBC editing suites - my dad trained as a sound recordist at the BBC in the 60s and bought these from M7B's, under the arches by the train station in Leeds, in the '80s.
they sound realy quite lovely - I've never seen quite so much hardware inside a loudspeaker.
cheers
jonnie meadowcroft

Click image for larger version

Name:	ls1-2-121 outside.jpg
Views:	193
Size:	44.3 KB
ID:	267865

Click image for larger version

Name:	ls1-2-121 no grille.jpg
Views:	189
Size:	49.5 KB
ID:	267866

Click image for larger version

Name:	ls1-2-121 label.jpg
Views:	179
Size:	35.7 KB
ID:	267867

Click image for larger version

Name:	ls1-2-121 inside.jpg
Views:	228
Size:	73.3 KB
ID:	267868
jonnie_m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 2:00 pm   #2
paulsherwin
Moderator
 
paulsherwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Oxford, UK
Posts: 25,278
Default Re: BBC LS2/1/121 monitors

We have several members with extensive BBC experience - they may be able to supply more info.
paulsherwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 2:20 pm   #3
Nickthedentist
Dekatron
 
Nickthedentist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Oxford, UK.
Posts: 16,914
Default Re: BBC LS2/1/121 monitors

Wow, I see what you mean. That's a helluva crossover for a 2-way design! I've seen active speakers with fewer components.

How big is the bass unit? Looks Goodmans-y to me.

Note your typo, the label says 1/2/121 Maybe the mods could amend it for us?

Still not a lot on the internet, even on Mark Hennesey's site.
Nickthedentist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 2:43 pm   #4
paulsherwin
Moderator
 
paulsherwin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Oxford, UK
Posts: 25,278
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Title edited.

The BBC put a lot of effort and resources into their crossover designs.
paulsherwin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 3:02 pm   #5
G6Tanuki
Dekatron
 
G6Tanuki's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Wiltshire, UK.
Posts: 12,234
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

There looks to be rather more than just a crossover in there. I can see a relay and at least one transistor.

I wonder what they are for??
__________________
"All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream" -Edgar Allan Poe.
G6Tanuki is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 4:16 pm   #6
jonnie_m
Diode
 
Join Date: Sep 2022
Location: Lancaster, Lancashire, UK.
Posts: 9
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Quote:
Originally Posted by paulsherwin View Post
Title edited.

The BBC put a lot of effort and resources into their crossover designs.
Thankyou
jonnie_m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 4:22 pm   #7
jonnie_m
Diode
 
Join Date: Sep 2022
Location: Lancaster, Lancashire, UK.
Posts: 9
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

The other one is stamped LS1/2/156, so I guess there were at least 156 made. We've 3 more. My dad also got a BBC DRD5 record deck which he built into a box with an amplifier and gave me for Christmas, in 1982, along with a pair of transmission line speakers using B110 &T27 units, to which I've been listening ever since.
jonnie_m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 5:29 pm   #8
Radio Wrangler
Moderator
 
Radio Wrangler's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Fife, Scotland, UK.
Posts: 20,920
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

M&B bought and resold a lot of ex-BBC equipment. All sorts of modules for racks in equipment room, some audio stuff, some TV. It tended to go quite cheaply, priced to make the parts in them attractive for re-use. Occasionally, you'd have to dance around a big console recorder or something of that ilk.

Boy could I spend some money If I could nip back there in a time machine.

David
__________________
Can't afford the volcanic island yet, but the plans for my monorail and the goons' uniforms are done
Radio Wrangler is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 5:40 pm   #9
Stevie342000
Hexode
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Greater Manchester, UK.
Posts: 360
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Does this help?
http://www.bbceng.info/ti/eqpt/LS1_2.pdf

There are other pieces of BBC kit that can be found here....go back to parent directory for Kit earlier than 1960 and all the technical instruction manuals: https://www.bbceng.info/ti/aco-post-1960.htm

Last edited by Stevie342000; 11th Nov 2022 at 5:43 pm. Reason: I forgot
Stevie342000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11th Nov 2022, 10:26 pm   #10
mhennessy
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Evesham, Worcestershire, UK.
Posts: 4,114
Default Re: BBC LS2/1/121 monitors

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickthedentist View Post
Wow, I see what you mean. That's a helluva crossover for a 2-way design! I've seen active speakers with fewer components.

How big is the bass unit? Looks Goodmans-y to me.

Note your typo, the label says 1/2/121 Maybe the mods could amend it for us?

Still not a lot on the internet, even on Mark Hennesey's site.
I mention them on this page, complete with links to the document already linked to in post #9, plus the AM8/4 amplifier:

https://www.markhennessy.co.uk/rogers/overview.htm

But it really is just a mention. I've never seen them in the flesh.

It's worth saying that any speaker starting "LS1" was intended for non-critical use, and will not bear any relation - in sound quality terms - to the more famous speakers like the LS3/5A. But I really can't say how good or bad the LS1/2 was. My view is likely coloured by the only LS1 speaker I've heard, which is the LS1/8. Frankly, this was a terrible speaker, in sound quality terms at least (the build quality is quite reasonable - I say more about it on that same page). It was only intended for offices and similar, and the BBC must have had thousands of them, so it was a successful design in a way.

That said, it looks like they were trying a lot harder with the LS1/2, and I would hope it is a lot better than the LS1/8. For comparison, the "crossover" in the LS1/8 amounted to just a single 1uF cap for the two 3" cone tweeters.

I do like the muting relay to protect the tweeter when spooling.

Yes, Goodmans 8".

As there are pictures here, I'll add a link from my site to this thread. Feel free to post more, especially the crossover bits...

Mark
mhennessy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th Nov 2022, 9:32 am   #11
jonnie_m
Diode
 
Join Date: Sep 2022
Location: Lancaster, Lancashire, UK.
Posts: 9
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Thanks Mark, that's quite a site you've got. I've got some old bits of BBC electronics Kit that I guess you'd probably find interesting, probably from M&B. I'll take some pictures. We also had some large BBC monitors with 15" units and celestion HF1300 type tweeters - the cabinets took the form of an unequal quadrilateral, from the side, with reasonably large radii between the faces. they ultimately became the garden party speakers with some Fane concentric units mounted in them. I've fond memories of listening to some classic motorcycle racing, out in the garden, that my Dad had recorded.
jonnie_m is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 15th Nov 2022, 10:17 pm   #12
beamcurrent
Heptode
 
beamcurrent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Camberley, Surrey, UK.
Posts: 731
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Our BBC OB van, MCR21 has a LS1/2 installed as the main sound monitor in the ceiling. This is not the correct original speaker which was a Pye unit type 845703 which was a curious not square shape. this fitted well into the ceiling cut out into which the LS1/2 is a poor fit.

If the correct Pye LS ever turns up we will replace it, not too impressed with our LS1/2.
__________________
Regards Brian

Visit the Virtual Broadcast TV Camera Museum
beamcurrent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Nov 2022, 9:20 am   #13
Simondm
Tetrode
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Bristol, UK.
Posts: 81
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

My period as a BBC Audio Supervisor was the 1980s.

There were various BBC designs that had alternative asymetric enclosures, usually for OB vans of various types. One later design springs immediately to mind, the LS5/8 (I'm trying to remember the earlier designs I encountered like that). They usually had the standard baffle, with a wedge-shaped enclosure of similar volume to the original. Obviously, non-parallel sides would dramatically change the resonances but I assume this was tuned-out in situ.

When there was separate provision, the sound control "rooms" in scanners were extremely small, so even a second human inside would itself make a huge difference - you relied on being close to the monitors, and the distance was usually less than three feet. I much preferred the "leave the bass well alone" philosophy, and, as long as you were prepared to do that, LS3/5As were quite adequate for most things.

Bristol, where I was based, was home to CMCR3 when I started, which possibly had a wedge-shaped LS1/2 on the ceiling above the control desk (sound, vision mixer/director, prod. asst. and Eng. Mgr positions), but it was built by PYE (RCA, Philips/Peto Scott PC 60 camera channels), so may have had the speaker mentioned above. I was a young audio sprog back then, and was rarely allowed in the scanner at all, never mind the control area during production!

M. Hennessy is quite right the LS1/xx series wasn't intended for critical monitoring (and in a VT or TK channel, the noise of motors and vacuum piumps, etc. was considerable). I was told that the 3/xx series was intended for portable (OB) use, and the 5xx series for studio monitoring, however both 3/5As and 3/7s were used for studio monitoring extensively. the 5/xx. I suspect we only had a few 5/8s because of the cost.

In radio vans I never saw the asymetric speakers used. We had speaker stands immediately behind the consoles, with 5/8s or 3/7s clear of the walls angled towards the mix position. It was considered very important though to get the tweeters at head height - the 3/7s were strapped-in upside down for that reason.

On reading the EngInf document, I note that the relay was intended to mute the HF unit during tape spooling. This was very sensible, as we got through quite a few tweeters in my Audio Unit, c/o a senior colleague who insisted on shoving the tape against the heads whilst spooling - earlier monitors, such as the LSU10 didn't have good HF response (BBC 'brown' sound), and, having valve amps, were more robust anyway (soft clipping?). LS3/5As were especially vulnerable, also 3/7s (I have a stack of spare Audax tweeters for mine, just in case).

Finally, of course there were two basic versions of the Spendor BC1, used for monitoring in the late 1970s/early 1980s. One was "self powered", and had a built-in amplifier module fixed to the back panel with a chunky heatsink and volume pot sticking out, and a PO socket for the input. They also had "fragile" tweeters, and the amp was a bit under-powered, which probably didn't help.

When I started, the self-powered BC1s were the main monitors in several radio studio areas (two still used a solitary LSU10 !!!). By the end of the 1980s, every studio was 3/5As, 3/7s, 5/8s, and a pair of 5/9s in the main TV studio (supposed to be the dog's pyjamas, but nobody really liked them apart from the physical size in a small control room).

I worked in the dubbing theatres in Ealing and Lime Grove (on attachment) in the mid 1980s - they were all LS 5/8s, sometimes with Auratones for compatibility checking. We had Auratones in most TV sound areas in Bristol too, by the end of the 1980s, but they mostly got used for talkback, and on rare occasions settling arguments with production about audibility. They only really had relevance in film dubbing (where we also handled video post production sweetening), as in other places you had insufficient time to do much remedial work.

As time progressed, the prevalence of the lower-quality BBC designs diminished, mostly in favour of LS3/5As. It was much easier to keep a stock of them (we had quite a few bookable from audio stores), and as long as the tweeters were actually working, any two made a good stereo pair.

Probably way too much info. Sorry.
Simondm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Nov 2022, 12:31 pm   #14
Nickthedentist
Dekatron
 
Nickthedentist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Oxford, UK.
Posts: 16,914
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Never too much info here, thank you.
Nickthedentist is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Nov 2022, 12:46 pm   #15
stevehertz
Dekatron
 
stevehertz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Rugeley, Staffordshire, UK.
Posts: 7,585
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Great info Simon, thanks.
__________________
A digital radio is the latest thing, but a vintage wireless is forever..
stevehertz is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 16th Nov 2022, 2:02 pm   #16
mhennessy
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Evesham, Worcestershire, UK.
Posts: 4,114
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

The differences between LS1, LS3 and LS5 are discussed on my earlier link. Just because a speaker was originally designed in response to a request from an OB team, or a studio team, it doesn't stop the design from being used in the other application - so yes, it wasn't at all unusual to see LS3/5As in studios, and LS5/8s in larger OB vans. BTW, one of my pet peeves - happily not mentioned in this thread: the idea that "LS3" = grade 2 and "LS5" = grade 1. The BBC never had grade 1 and grade 2 monitor speakers (though picture monitors could be grade 1, 2 or 3 - I guess that's where that could have come from).

An earlier design in a trapezoidal cabinet was the LS3/4. It was a long-standing model - some were still in use in TVC before it was sold. There were several variations along the way, including a very late one containing the drive units from the LS5/9 (designated LS5/11). There was also the LS5/2.

The LS5/8 versions (LS5/8L and LS5/8R) are mentioned on my site, with pictures: https://www.markhennessy.co.uk/roger...m#ob-variation

The change of shape can only help...

The biggest problem with a regular box with 3 pairs of parallel sides is standing waves. Even with air damping - usually Rockwool or similar for BBC designs, but sometimes foam - you'll still get standing waves that could affect the measured frequency response. Irregular-shaped cabinets fix this problem, which is why curvy injection-moulded plastic and die-cast aluminium cabinets are so popular today.

Changing the panel sizes will change the frequencies at which they resonate, but as BBC designs use added mass to push these down in frequency (and Q), I doubt it causes any problems. If anything, it's likely to help, as it'll spread it all around.

The OB version I show on my site was probably the best-sounding pair of LS5/8s I've heard. They were assisted by additional EQ - stock LS5/8s are far from flat, especially at the bass end. I'd love to learn more about the response curve used.

The amplifier in the Spendor BC1A could suffer from thermal runaway. I know that a lot in BH were converted to standard passive operation (by replacing the mains inlet LNE with a standard XLR-3). We've still got a handful here at WN in original working condition, but they don't get a lot of use. Nice to have access to a classic though.

My experience with LS3/5A pair matching for stereo isn't so good. If they were the later 11 ohm model, you should be fine, but the 15 ohm models were all over the place. If you found an unmolested pair from the same manufacturer with similar-ish serial numbers, you might be OK, but no promises! I never managed to get half-way sane results with a pair made from an 11 ohm and 15 ohm examples, even though everyone had been told that was possible. The problems with 15 ohm models have been discussed here recently, and there's a lot about them on my site - it was hard enough when new, but they suffer terribly from ageing, and any surviving original 15 ohm model will be out of spec today, even if it has been treated with kid gloves, because of the glues and "dope" failing. This post has a bit more info: https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/...5&postcount=97

Wherever I've worked, I've kept records of the LS3/5As in service, and swapped them around to match operational pairs as best as possible. It usually helps, but not always - especially if they've been worked on in the past.

The LS5/9 was never popular, but it commits no more sins than any other BBC design - it's just unfortunate that commits the wrong sorts of sins. It's also very prone to ageing. However, in my direct experience, everyone changed their opinion on the LS5/9 when they heard them properly - several people I know bought pairs for themselves after a visit to my place. They're quite fussy about stands and placement. Get that right - which we never did in the BBC - and they are surprisingly good.
mhennessy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Nov 2022, 8:12 pm   #17
Simondm
Tetrode
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Bristol, UK.
Posts: 81
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

I think the LS3/4 (trapezoidal) was what we originally had in Bristol's Studio B (and probably in the 1970s mono days in the big studio, "A", too). During my tenure in "B" it was replaced with a normal LS5/8, which was somewhat nicer to use.

Audio monitoring was always awkward in the regional TV news studios (Bristol wasn't alone in this), as there usually was (and still is, at least locally) a combined production, lighting and sound gallery. You can't monitor at a sensible level without interfering with other people's tasks.

The 5/8 seemed to make matters easier - I'm not sure if its tweeter was more directional, but I found it easier to correct incoming sound issues, without annoying the director overly much (she operated the vision mixer as well as directing, and sat right next to me!).

Regarding their EQ, we got maintenance to have several goes at the pair in Dubbing because of the LF, as you mention. Once they'd put in a bit of effort however, they sounded very nice, and vastly superior to the BC1s we previously had.

I"ll have to take your word on the 5/9s - In my time we only had the one pair (in A's sound gallery), and I know there was some 'discussion' amongst the senior supervisors who usually mixed in there. Their introduction coincided with a major refit, including a new Neve desk and extensive acoustic changes (lots of nice birch slats over absorbent panelling, etc.) it looked very pretty, but didn't do a huge amount to improve a difficult acoustic. I was underwhelmed by them at the time, and never got a chance to do a direct comparision with 5/8s.

At home here I have 3/7s and domestic 11-Ohm 3/5As (presently rebuilding the Quads for the 3/7s), but had you asked me in 1989, I'd have unequivocally said 5/8s were my favourites. All of the pairs I've used have been 405-driven and pre-dated the Chord versions.

Actually I think Quad ESL63s are slightly better still, but as far as I know the BBC never used those for monitoring!
Simondm is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th Nov 2022, 8:28 pm   #18
PaulDarzi
Tetrode
 
Join Date: Nov 2022
Location: Near Worcestershire/Gloucestershire border (in WR), UK.
Posts: 63
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

Thank you @jonnie_m for sharing your photos, the crossover is truly amazing!

Also, thank you Mark and Simon for your informative posts - I've spent a happy few minutes browsing Mark's site bookmarking some pages to read properly later.

The comment about LS1/ versus LS3/ make sense of a thread (elsewhere) about sound / speaker quality
- and the "Rogers Story" on Mark's site explains the peregrinations Rogers went through, good to know.
PaulDarzi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th Nov 2022, 7:20 am   #19
Ted Kendall
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kington, Herefordshire, UK.
Posts: 3,218
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

I never liked the 5/9 - it wasn't an informative tool, whereas the 5/8 certainly was - if a spot mic was poking out, it told you straight and you were able to correct it confidently. The serious music assembly channel in Kensington House (TRU) had a pair of carefully sited 3/7s, and they both worked as monitors and sounded wonderful.
Ted Kendall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 18th Nov 2022, 3:14 pm   #20
mhennessy
Dekatron
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Evesham, Worcestershire, UK.
Posts: 4,114
Default Re: BBC LS1/2/121 monitors

I've always felt sorry for the LS5/9. It had a difficult birth. The design was done after Dudley Hardwood retired from R&D, and Designs Department also lost key members of staff. As a result, expertise levels were less than usual, and confidence even lower. I have copies of memos from this period that acknowledge this - unfortunately I'm not allowed to share them - but they show that the new LS5/9 was not welcomed, to put it lightly.

As was the case with the LS5/8, the LS5/9 that we all know bears little resemblance to the prototype that R&D produced. R&D did the right thing; they produced speakers that had substantially flat frequency responses. But after going through Designs Department, we have what we see today...

In the case of the LS5/9, ageing is a real problem. Not as bad as 15 ohm LS3/5As in dB terms, but unluckily for the poor 5/9, the peak that develops is in the 3kHz region, an octave above the ~1.5kHz peak that 15 ohm LS3/5As are (in)famous for. You might get away with a peak at 1.5kHz, but no-one wants a peak at 3kHz! The peak is around 3-4dB in the samples I've measured - but it's the worst place for it. The 1.5dB "Bextrene peak" with LS3/5s can easily be 6dB or more, and it's a higher Q too.

This peak in the LS5/9 is caused by the PVC surround, which gets stiffer with age as it attempts to return to its original shape. You can prove this with nothing more sophisticated than a hair drier!

To get a sensible bass resonant frequency, the stiff PVC surround mandated an unusually "loose" spider, meaning the unit is prone to drift. Rubbing voice coils are all too common. Rogers helped by enlarging the gap (and upping the magnet to compensate), but that just postpones the inevitable. Periodic rotation is recommended.

Another problem with the ageing PVC surround is the effect on the bass tuning. It's actually not too bad compared to other non-BBC speakers, even today, because the LS5/9 lacks the bass boost that the LS5/8 (and LS3/5A to a lesser extent) have, it doesn't have the usual "warm" BBC sound that everyone is used to. If you only work at the BBC and are only experienced with BBC speakers, then it's no surprise that you wouldn't like the 5/9. But those folk who are used to more typical commercial designs don't really comment on the bass IME.

This is one of the things that makes them fussy about placement. If you put them on a solid mass-loaded domestic hi-fi stand of 40cm or so, near to the rear wall, they get back some of the bass warmth that's lacking when they are on tall, wobbly stands in the middle of nowhere. And if you have a decent rug or carpet, plus plenty of soft furnishings, the 3kHz excess becomes much less objectionable. Under those conditions, I'd pick the 5/9 over the 3/5A or the 5/8 - and I know that because I've tried it, as the photos on my website show!

The 5/9 - like the 5/8 - has a HF lift, thanks to the Audax tweeter. It doesn't show on the 5/8 design report, but is there on the 5/9 report, suggesting that the tweeter changed in those early years. Looking at some of my measurements, it's about 6dB. There were 2 versions - the one the BBC picked had a lift at 11kHz, but the other one had a lighter diaphragm and it had a peak at 15kHz. That's the version that's available today, and this is one of the things that Graham Audio had to contend with when designing their version.

The production LS5/8 lacks the slot in front of the woofer that Harwood's prototype had. This makes the off-axis response much worse - you get away with that in a heavily treated control room, but not in more typical domestic environments. So out of the professional environment, the LS5/8 is actually quite hard to make work (quite apart from the bass excess!). Graham have found the same with their version, so have stopped taking it to shows. The LS5/5 is infinitely better in that regard, and their version is probably the ultimate expression of the BBC monitor concept from the Harwood era. Definitely take a listen if you get the chance.

I've only ever seen a single LS5/5A - it was in our telecine area, which was ripped out in 1997 to make way for 5 bays worth of file servers and other IT tatt. I'm told that they weren't well enough matched for stereo, but I can't deny or confirm that. They didn't play loud enough for many in the 1970s, hence the LS5/8. Since hearing the Graham version, I have played around a bit with putting slots in front of drive units, and have been impressed by the results - it's a shame aesthetic concerns stop it being done more often.

We were lucky - we had a separate (small) sound gallery. That changed in 2003 in the new building, sadly. It's very common today, and makes the job extremely difficult. For regional TV, a pair of LS5/9s were absolutely fine. In the mono days, before my time, there was a single LS5/8, but I dread to think how it must have sounded in such a small space. That was the only one on that site, but we had loads here at WN. Mostly gone now - can't say I miss them, as they all struggled to image properly, and often hummed. Changing C5 and C10 on the Quad boards helped a lot. We now have a representative mix of the sorts you'd find across the corporation, and have a lot of fun comparing them and wondering how on earth some of them made it past even the most basic selection exercises! Speaker selection exercises are always controversial because some people have very strong feelings (which they don't always manage to hide on their results sheets, meaning their results have to be discarded, wasting everyone's time) - as a result, people just tend to look around to see what everyone else bought. It's a bit of a mess, as you'd expect. Still, I guess that's the least of the BBC's problems right now...
mhennessy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools



All times are GMT. The time now is 9:00 am.


All information and advice on this forum is subject to the WARNING AND DISCLAIMER located at https://www.vintage-radio.net/rules.html.
Failure to heed this warning may result in death or serious injury to yourself and/or others.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Copyright ©2002 - 2023, Paul Stenning.