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Hints, Tips and Solutions (Do NOT post requests for help here) If you have any useful general hints and tips for vintage technology repair and restoration, please share them here. PLEASE DO NOT POST REQUESTS FOR HELP HERE!

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Old 23rd Sep 2010, 9:20 pm   #21
threeseven
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Default Re: Wd40!

I hate the stuff and the smell !! The ONLY thing I've ever used it for is as assembly lubricant when reinstalling bolts on various bits of cars as it sometimes allows hand installation which is quicker than using a wrench or ratchet. Even then I prefer a product called GT85.
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Old 23rd Sep 2010, 9:44 pm   #22
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Default Re: Wd40!

I work outside with it. I find the smell brings on sneezing fits and headaches!

Cheers,

Steve P.
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Old 23rd Sep 2010, 9:49 pm   #23
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Default Re: Wd40!

I am a great fan of WD40, i have used it for all sorts over the years, i also use it in pots & wavechange switches, seems to work well, as does waxoyl!
I would agree that it is an excellent cleaner, but NOT a permanent lubricant.
Used sparingly, it is a good thing to keep handy in the workshop

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Old 23rd Sep 2010, 10:05 pm   #24
ALANS ANITAS
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Default Re: Wd40!

Has anyone used any of cheap clones such as 151 and are they any good?

ALAN
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Old 23rd Sep 2010, 10:37 pm   #25
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Default Re: Wd40!

WD40 leaves an oily residue which over a year evaporates to a sticky mess. I would keep it away from open switches for this reason.

I thoroughly recommend a cheaper alternative called GT85. This is much lighter, a better cleaner, and leaves only a slight oily residue which is claimed to contain PTFE. http://www.gt85.co.uk/about.htm.

Only trouble is the smell is stronger than WD40!
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Old 24th Sep 2010, 5:56 am   #26
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Default Re: Wd40!

I'm a great fan of it, buy it in the 5L containers, quite like the smell as well, I use it for most of the jobs mentioned in previous posts, also, and its probably not recommended for it, when I've got dirty oily hands after a job on the car, a quick spray and most of dirt has gone.

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Old 24th Sep 2010, 8:38 am   #27
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Default Re: Wd40!

It is like Marmite - you love it or hate it and there seems to be very little grey area in between!

I personally find it very useful - at various times in my life.

In My Youth
=========
On Scalextric cars, as it will dissolve old sticky oils. Its lubricating properties are 'ok' for a resonably competetive race, but PTFE is the way to get a competetive edge.

Bycycle repairs - chrome polishing and protecting - quick and practical. Excellent for washing ball bearings!

Young Adult
=========
Any owner of a mini (a real one not a new BMW type) carried the stuff - it was essential on a damp day and in driving rain. Even a rubber boot on the distributor and a plate stuck on the front grill did not protect the distributor fully. Water displacement is what it does 'in spades'.

When I purchased an unusable motorcycle from a friend, it worked to tame the front brake. The MZ front disc brake was so violent it had thrown the owner off the bike twice. I used WD40 to remove the dirt and oxide on the surface of the disc, reduced the efficiency of the brake and made it rideable.

Adult
====
Now with a Son, I've gone full circle. Repairing Scalextric cars again (although I never REALLY stopped), repairing and cleaning trains, repairing his bike.
It is usually the quickest for removing glues and sticky c*ap from surfaces. It dissolves certain paints (sometimes works on toy cars), tars, tobacco stained radio grills. It needs washing off afterwards, but dissolves lots of substances quickly.

As for working on cars in general - it is usually there with me, like an adjustable spanner, big screwdriver and a pair of pliers.

But, like most things though, if used for the wrong purpose - or used too liberally, it causes problems. Keep it away from commutators. Keep it away from plastacine and blu-tac!

WD40 smells great

SEAN
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Old 24th Sep 2010, 11:56 am   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ALANS ANITAS View Post
Has anyone used any of cheap clones such as 151 and are they any good?

ALAN
Duck Oil, Double T Maintenance Spray etc., I think they are just as good.

I find it's brilliant as a freeing agent for rusty fixings. It's not a proper lubricating oil, so it won't last or have as good a performance as one. My cousin told me that a drop of diesel works as well as a freeing agent, but the spray can is a lot more convenient and I haven't tried it.

A clock repairer told me it was slightly corrosive and certainly shouldn't be used on clocks or delicate mechanisms.

OK as a cleaning agent, if you're stuck. You can use it to clean the surface of wax caps and see what the value is. White spirit is as good or better.

As for moisture displacement such as car electrics, it will get you out of a hole, but after a time seems to leave a residue which attracts dirt and moisture, so you end up using it a lot. Eventually, I washed the distributor and leads in warm soapy water and dried them in the airing cupboard and that was a better solution.

It's best regarded as a freeing agent and emergency lubricant/moisture displacer in my view. The spray can makes it a bit too handy.

Pete.
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Old 25th Sep 2010, 3:04 pm   #29
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Default Re: Wd40!

Maybe I need to change my name to GT85 addict!

Paul
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Old 25th Sep 2010, 3:27 pm   #30
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Post Re: Wd40!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jcaines View Post
when I've got dirty oily hands after a job on the car, a quick spray and most of dirt has gone.

John
It will clean hands just like petrol does but could lead to getting dermatitis. Swafega is better. WD is good on plated parts to stop rust pitting.
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Old 25th Sep 2010, 5:42 pm   #31
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Default Re: Wd40!

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Originally Posted by geofy View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcaines View Post
when I've got dirty oily hands after a job on the car, a quick spray and most of dirt has gone.

John
It will clean hands just like petrol does but could lead to getting dermatitis. Swafega is better. WD is good on plated parts to stop rust pitting.
Anything that gets oily muck off your hands is likely to get rid of natural oils as well. Probably best not to worry about it and then use something to rejuvenate them after they are clean - I've found barrier cream not to be terribly practical but I know some people swear by it
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Old 25th Sep 2010, 9:30 pm   #32
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Default Re: Wd40!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ilikevalvesme View Post
When I bought my Dodge, the tape player didn't work - I soon found that someone in the past had tried to 'fix' it by spraying about half a can of WD-40 through the tape flap. New radio required.....
I've seen video recorders trashed the same way.
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Old 26th Sep 2010, 9:25 am   #33
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Default Re: Wd40!

WD denotes Water Dispersant.

If I want to lubricate something I use oil, grease or collodial graphite (oil dag) as appropriate. If I want to free off rusted parts I use brake fluid or diesel fuel. Where the unpleasant odour is a problem I use penetrating oil.

Has anyone found a use for carb cleaner in vintage radio work?
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Old 26th Sep 2010, 9:44 am   #34
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Cleaning corroded aluminium IFT cans ?
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Old 26th Sep 2010, 9:45 am   #35
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Default Re: Wd40!

Possibly. I use Solvol Autosol for that being sure to clean off the white deposits it leaves.
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Old 26th Sep 2010, 10:01 am   #36
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Quote:
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WD denotes Water Dispersant.
... and 40 denotes it took him 40 times to get it right
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Old 26th Sep 2010, 10:14 am   #37
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Default Re: Wd40!

I have used wd, or, to be more correct Servisol Super 40-AFAIK a similar product- to clean
old 78rpm records. In some cases virtually unplayable discs have been restored by this means, presumably because the Super 40 dissolves the accumulated dirt and debris in the record groove. No long term ill effects so far, either.
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Old 19th Oct 2010, 10:33 pm   #38
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Default Re: Wd40!

It is great for starting balky car and lawn mower engines too. Just spray it in the air intake or carb, when you are out of starting fluid.

Another great use I found for it was it worked well for cleaning off the white plastic "scrunge" off old radio & TV knobs, and to clean Bakelite too.
( I am given to understand that the "scrunge" is the de-composition of the materials used to make the plastic knobs).
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Old 19th Oct 2010, 11:57 pm   #39
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Default Re: Wd40!

I once used the stuff in an oil lantern, worked surprisingly well, but, the fumes stank the place out, so that went out the window (metaphorically!!!)...

Then there's also the flame thrower, light the end of the straw and blast some WD through it, outdoors of course, I never did manage to get that sooty mark off one of the ceilings of my first house....

Can't say that I use WD40 these days, mainly cos I haven't got any, but also cos there's no reason to use it, the sleeve bearings in my vacuums use 3-in-1, loosening stuff up I use heat, and a bit of 3-in-1, and squeaky or sticky things, yep, you guessed it, 3-in-1...

I'm sure there are uses I could use it for, I just haven't found them yet...
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Old 20th Oct 2010, 7:39 am   #40
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Default Re: Wd40!

Quote:
Originally Posted by geofy View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcaines View Post
when I've got dirty oily hands after a job on the car, a quick spray and most of dirt has gone.

John
It will clean hands just like petrol does but could lead to getting dermatitis. Swafega is better. WD is good on plated parts to stop rust pitting.
Good point. White spirit can cause dermatitis and can do so quite quickly. You don't have to be using it all day to get the problem. In the same vein, that stupid idea that people get relief from arthritis by spraying the affected joint with WD40 is both dangerous and false. People who believe in certain treatments 'think' they make them better and say so. It doesn't mean they have any effect outside the person's head. That's why people spend a fortune on homoeopathy. The idea that a single molecule of a substance in hundreds of gallons of water can affect your health is probably the ultimate in medical stupidity, but there are plenty of people who swear by it. The good thing is that homoeopathic remedies won't actually harm you - spraying your joints with an industrial lubricant based on white spirit WILL harm you.
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