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-   -   Crompton 60W bulb (https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/showthread.php?t=179120)

Tom williams 18th Apr 2021 9:13 pm

Crompton 60W bulb
 
2 Attachment(s)
Hi all,

I own a Crompton 60W bulb as part of my vintage electrical fittings collection, and was wondering what it is used for, it is bright red, the only things I can think of it being used for are as follows:
The flashing red lights you see at level crossings.
As part of one of those strings you see hung up at events.

If there are any other purposes for this bulb, can you please let me know as it is quite an interesting subject for me.

Tom

mark_in_manc 18th Apr 2021 9:20 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Maybe the glow in one of those 'magicoal' type electric or gas fires, with a fibreglass translucent pretend log / coal fire. The bulb would be lit under it; our (gas) one had shades with slits in which were meant to turn in the convected hot air from the hot bulb, and create flickering effects on the fibreglass. They usually siezed up, and generally the bulbs popped and were left un-fixed!

The Philpott 18th Apr 2021 9:35 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
60w is too high for unprotected exterior use, i think that it's an indoor lamp 'just for fun' or for niche use... (vital Bordello equipment anyway!)
Fireglow lamps are typically clear not pearl finish, it makes the flicker effect more pronounced.
Dave

russell_w_b 18th Apr 2021 10:06 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Blackpool illuminations?

I've seen 15 Watt pygmy lamps the same colour as that for bedside lights: my auntie had one when I was a kid. 60 Watt is a bit bright for that, though.

Cobaltblue 18th Apr 2021 10:18 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Dark room maybe for film development.

ISTR red lignts when we were developing B&W film when I was at coledge.

Cheers

Mike T

John_Dw 18th Apr 2021 10:27 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Probably a 'vintage' heavy duty bulb designed for use in old fashioned decorative lights, think Christmas or Blackpool....If you hold it up to a strong light source can you see how many supports are on the filament? I would suspect at least six spread over 300 degrees or more....

winston_1 18th Apr 2021 10:49 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Coloured light bulbs like that were fairly common back in the day. I remember red, orange, yellow, green, and blue ones. I have a red 30w strip light of the type used to illuminate pictures or sometimes found in wardrobes. Don't know what that was for.

bigfathairyvika 18th Apr 2021 11:07 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Disco light boxes.

emeritus 18th Apr 2021 11:39 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I don't have any vacuum lamps to try myself, but an old school physics book describes an experiment with two bulbs of the same wattage, one vacuum and one gas-filled, where the glass of the vacuum lamp was said to remain cold to the touch in operation. It was said that, for the vacuum bulb, radiant heat would pass through glass without appreciable absorbtion, whereas the gas-filled bulb's glass would get heated by convection. I believe this was why bare vacuum bulbs could be used outdoors without their glass being damaged by falling rain.

broadgage 19th Apr 2021 6:00 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by emeritus (Post 1365842)
I don't have any vacuum lamps to try myself, but an old school physics book describes an experiment with two bulbs of the same wattage, one vacuum and one gas-filled, where the glass of the vacuum lamp was said to remain cold to the touch in operation. It was said that, for the vacuum bulb, radiant heat would pass through glass without appreciable absorbtion, whereas the gas-filled bulb's glass would get heated by convection. I believe this was why bare vacuum bulbs could be used outdoors without their glass being damaged by falling rain.

Only pertaily true IMHO.
A vaccuum bulb of 60 watts will produce about the same heat as a gasfilled bulb of 60 watts.
The gas filled lamp will get very hot in that part of the glass directly over the filament, due to convection, and if rain drops strike this part then the glass may shatter.

The vacuum bulb will heat the glass by radiation, the glass below the filament will be warmed to a similar degree as that above.
Therefore the whole bulb becomes moderatly warm and unless of unusually high wattage, should survive contact with rain.

Vacuum lamps tend to be of lower power, so not only is the heat better distributed, but there is less heat in total.

15 watt and 25 watt mains voltage lamps tend to be vacuum types, with 60 watt and up being gas filled. 40 watt may be either.
Vacuum is preffered for very low current lamps, it is the operating CURRENT not the wattage that is relevant. A 21 watt vehicle bulb will be gas filled, but as above a mains voltage 25 watt lamp be vacuum.


Returning to the red 60 watt lamp in the O/P, this was probably for decorative use, indoor festive lighting, or possibly industrial warning lamps that need to be seen from a distance.

Probably not for fuel effect electric heater, as has been said these tended to be clear, and also amber not deep red.

Not suitable for photographic dark room use as the red does not extend over the entire bulb, observe a little white light escaping near the cap.

Also unlikely to be for red warning lights atop tall structures, these tended to use clear lamps in a red enclosure.

DMcMahon 19th Apr 2021 7:44 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Your example is probably a different voltage and wattage rating but red bulbs are used in submarines for when they switch to "Red light/Red lighting" operational mode.

David

Paul_RK 19th Apr 2021 7:46 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I think it may be the type of bulb used in the Glow Baby, a large plastic coated wire frame sold chiefly as a bed warmer but also for general airing and clothes drying. We had one from the early '60s when I was a small child, and a few years ago the capricious urge Nostalgia prompted me to acquire an example. Just now I referred to its instruction leaflet, which doesn't directly specify the bulb type fitted, but does recommend that if the unit is to be left in a bed for more than three hours the heat lamp should be exchanged for an ordinary 25W. or 40W. lamp, "thus spreading the heat value over a longer period with perfect safety".

Hmm, so much for that idea: I went to the attic to find the Glow Baby itself, and its likely original bulb is still fitted, a 100W one, very red, with "Glow Heat" as its brand. Still, there were probably similar contraptions back in the day, when few bedrooms were heated, so it's at least a class of device which may have given employment to such a lamp.

Paul

russell_w_b 19th Apr 2021 8:00 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Cobaltblue (Post 1365825)
Dark room maybe for film development.

ISTR red lignts when we were developing B&W film when I was at coledge.

It's the wrong colour for a printing safe-light and there's white light emanating from the end! A bit bright too.

Unless it was mounted behind a deep-red well-glass, of course. I have several coloured lamps (greens, yellows, blues, reds... similar vintage) and they were last used in anger on a sort of poor-man's 'disco-ceiling' at our works social club.

russell_w_b 19th Apr 2021 8:04 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by DMcMahon (Post 1365879)
' but red bulbs are used in submarines for when they switch to "Red light/Red lighting" operational mode.'

They do that in the 'gloom-room' radar ops at RAF Spadeadam too.

Glowing Bits! 19th Apr 2021 9:19 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Cobaltblue (Post 1365825)
Dark room maybe for film development.

ISTR red lignts when we were developing B&W film when I was at coledge.

Cheers

Mike T

Darkroom bulbs are usually 15 or 25W, I know that from having a darkroom in the past.

broadgage 19th Apr 2021 11:20 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Submarines and indeed surface ships do use red lighting at night, in order to preserve night vision.
I suspect that RN vessels use some special and expensive lamps, not something that can be purchased for less than £1 in the local hardware store.
Or standard clear lamps in a red cover.

Modern ships tend to use red fluorescent tubes, or LEDs.

Radio Wrangler 19th Apr 2021 2:35 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Butchers used to have a few red lamps in their displays before special phosphors were done for them in fluorescents.

David

Reelman 19th Apr 2021 5:52 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Isn’t this the sort of bulb used on hanging fairground lights? The bulb holder is placed on the wire and makes contact via sharp points that pierce the cable. Provides a quick and easy way to add lights to a cable without having to make any joints.
I use similar bulbs of different colours on battern holders for garden illumination.
Peter

broadgage 19th Apr 2021 6:33 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Reelman (Post 1366105)
Isnít this the sort of bulb used on hanging fairground lights? The bulb holder is placed on the wire and makes contact via sharp points that pierce the cable. Provides a quick and easy way to add lights to a cable without having to make any joints.
I use similar bulbs of different colours on battern holders for garden illumination.
Peter

Yes but 60 watts is a bit high for such purposes and would be liable to shatter if it got wet.
Fairground lights are often 25 watts, or 15 watts for the brighter colours such as pink, yellow and white.

Reelman 19th Apr 2021 6:49 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
“ 60 watts is a bit high for such purposes ”

I take your point but mine have survived several years of being permanently outside, there must have been times when rain fell on them whilst hot. However they are not used too much consuming, as they do, 300 watts!

Peter

Analogue man 25th Apr 2021 11:07 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tom williams (Post 1365800)
Hi all,

I own a Crompton 60W bulb as part of my vintage electrical fittings collection, and was wondering what it is used for, it is bright red, the only things I can think of it being used for are as follows:
The flashing red lights you see at level crossings.
As part of one of those strings you see hung up at events.

If there are any other purposes for this bulb, can you please let me know as it is quite an interesting subject for me.

Tom

The flashing lights on a level crossing were until recently 24v 36w clear lamps shining through a red lens. These days most have been replaced by red LEDs.

Heatercathodeshort 26th Apr 2021 10:16 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
2 Attachment(s)
Getting a bit deep here! LOL As W1 has mentioned it is just a coloured light bulb for decorative effects. I used to stock all the colours in 25W and 60W. High demand at Christmas, parties and weddings etc.
I think 25W was the maximum for outdoor use. They were also available in ES, SES and SBC holders.
The old fairground lamps were for 110V fed from DC dynamos. They are mostly LED now fitted into large plastic shades to resemble the old filament bulbs.
I have a large collection of vintage bulbs going back to around 1905. You would not believe the different types and colours available. The lamp business was a BIG one. John.

PS Ancient Amber 100W lamp still in use in my collection shed. J

kellymarie 26th Apr 2021 11:36 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I have several 25 watt colored bulbs in use in my disco room they are Cromton 25 watt bulbs for 200/250 volts they are all ES types guess how I found out that the outer metal screw part was live! My faveroute bulb is a sort of deep orange peach color. In keeping with a vintage theme they are powered via a collection of 2 pin 5 amp plugs into an adaptor in a 2 pin socket. Does anyone know if colored flu lamps still exist or is is possible to color a white tube? Thanks guys

emeritus 26th Apr 2021 11:58 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
When I was a student I made my own coloured bulbs using sprit-based permanent marker pens.

Bazz4CQJ 26th Apr 2021 12:17 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
My collection of red lamps consists of a 15W Mazda and a 60W Thorn. Both are 200/250V. Are they rare?

B

Station X 26th Apr 2021 1:20 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Some lamps were specified as being "fire lamps" I remember Woolworths selling them in the early 1970's.

"Magicoal" seems to ring a bell regarding the electric fires they were used in.

duncanlowe 26th Apr 2021 2:25 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Station X (Post 1368142)
Some lamps were specified as being "fire lamps" I remember Woolworths selling them in the early 1970's.

"Magicoal" seems to ring a bell regarding the electric fires they were used in.

They were used in many things, and also in gas fires. My Baxi Bermuda had one either side in pockets.

We also used a firelight bulb in a mockup campfire for Cubs and Scouts for 'indoor campfires'. Blue Peter did soemthing similar, but theirs became an actual fire, if anyone remembers that!

emeritus 26th Apr 2021 2:44 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I bought a set of 10 assorted 25W coloured GLS bulbs (by GE) from Screwfix when they were clearing their stocks of tungsten lamps at bargain prices. Still haven't used them yet! They are translucent like the OP's one, as opposed to transparent. All the red fire bulbs I have seen have had a clear red lacquer colouring.

Tom williams 26th Apr 2021 3:02 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by John_Dw (Post 1365826)
Probably a 'vintage' heavy duty bulb designed for use in old fashioned decorative lights, think Christmas or Blackpool....If you hold it up to a strong light source can you see how many supports are on the filament? I would suspect at least six spread over 300 degrees or more....

Hi John,

After just having a look, it turns out that there are 9 supports including the two powering the fillament.

Tom

broadgage 26th Apr 2021 4:48 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kellymarie (Post 1368095)
I have several 25 watt colored bulbs in use in my disco room they are Cromton 25 watt bulbs for 200/250 volts they are all ES types guess how I found out that the outer metal screw part was live! My faveroute bulb is a sort of deep orange peach color. In keeping with a vintage theme they are powered via a collection of 2 pin 5 amp plugs into an adaptor in a 2 pin socket. Does anyone know if colored flu lamps still exist or is is possible to color a white tube? Thanks guys


Coloured fluorescent tubes still exist, often in red, yellow, blue, green, and pink. The blue, green and pink lamps usually use a coloured phosphor, the red and yellow lamps are coated white ones.

Coloured compact fluorescent lamps are now hard to find but do turn up on ebay.
You can colour your own CFLs by dipping them in coloured gloss paint of the desired colour. Light the lamp afterwards for an hour or so to bake the paint onto the glass. Do this outside just in case a fault ignites the paint. Once the paint is thoroughly dry the lamps can be used safely.

Coloured LED lamps are rapidly taking over, red, blue, yellow, and green are readily available, and other colours exist.

merlinmaxwell 26th Apr 2021 5:40 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Darkroom lamps where made of red glass obviating any chance of a white light leak. Very under run to prolong life and no need for any blue light anyway, just as well they as where not cheap. Somewhere I have one I got second hand in 1970...72 when I got it for my teenage darkroom. Then I discovered the sodium street lights did a better job (at night) and for no cost!

broadgage 26th Apr 2021 5:56 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Back in the day, lamp makers offered "natural coloured" lamps. This referred to lamps made of coloured glass rather than clear glass lamps coated internally or externally with paint etc.

The red lamps were more expensive than other colours, this because red glass contains gold, in contrast to the base metal compounds used for other colours.

In the days before good quality fire resistant colour filter materials, much use was made of natural coloured lamps for theatre lighting.

Stuart R 26th Apr 2021 6:00 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
It's not a 'Fire Glow' bulb, they were clear and agreed, seemed to be a dark orange rather than red.

If I remember correctly, some Fire Glow bulbs used a 3-pin BC base (two electrical contacts but three locating spigots sticking out the side of the base). Were they hotter and this was to stop them getting put within (paper) lampshades?

I remember having to change the bulb holders on a Great Aunt's Berry Magicoal fire when 3 spigots became hard to come by in the 1980s.

SR

Heatercathodeshort 26th Apr 2021 7:23 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
3 Attachment(s)
I used to sell a lot of them! With the fires that used two bulbs the old girls used to come in the shop and ask why they both failed together. I used to explain that one probably failed weeks ago and you had not noticed. They never believed me.

The two prong fireglow lamps are pre war Berry's magicoal. The post war Berry's is the 3 pin bayonet. Most fires including the Belling employed the standard BC base.

They are single coil 60W types. Maybe Berry's used the 3 pin type to restrict guys from putting in just any old coloured lamp, spoiling the effect or maybe just to charge a bit more for the 'special' lamp. They did not get any hotter than a standard 60W lamp.

When I was first in the trade you could buy stained red glass lamps but they were twice the price of the standard lacquered type that cost 2/6d around 1964. Older people appeared to have a fetish about light bulbs often asking for strange types, finishes, and colours. I stocked the lot! They often called them globes and I had one lovely old dear that called them 'electric mantles'.
Regards, John.

Megatron 26th Apr 2021 7:44 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
www.lampwise.co.uk

Still sell the full range of coloured lamps in 60W.
dont think it is a special lamp. probably modern if it has an aluminium base.

kellymarie 26th Apr 2021 9:44 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I will try coloring an ordinary flu lamp using marker pens see what happens advice about powering it up outside is noted it should certainly get my nosey neighbors talking. The 3 pin base fireglo bulbs were about when I restored an old electric fire in about 1981 must admit I was chuffed to find a suitable bulb in a local electrical shop those bulbs kind of had what I call a toffe apple color to them I never tried licking one tho I may be mad im not crazy

broadgage 26th Apr 2021 11:43 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Still some availability of coloured CFLs on ebay. I suspect that production may have ceased and that availability will decline as LEDs take over the world.

Lancs Lad 27th Apr 2021 2:33 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
3 Attachment(s)
I was given a couple of these pink Crompton lamps/bulbs several years ago. They've never been used, still in original boxes.

They're nice to have - and I've no intention of just throwing them away - but I have no idea what I will ever use them for... :-/

kellymarie 27th Apr 2021 6:53 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Looks like the ones above are the BC version of what I have mine are all ES thats just what I was given and yes first thing I checked was that they weren't 110 volt US lamps

rambo1152 27th Apr 2021 6:21 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by kellymarie (Post 1368400)
Looks like the ones above are the BC version of what I have mine are all ES that's just what I was given and yes first thing I checked was that they weren't 110 volt US lamps

Twenty years ago I would have done the same, but these days ES lamps seem to have overtaken BC ones going by what's on sale.

The malaise started with stores like Ikea, but has spread to the likes of Tesco Asda and Sainsburys etc.

I beg to report that all the light fittings in my house are still Bayonet Cap (with the solitary exception of the one in the downstairs toilet which a builder managed to sneak in under the radar).

All's well.
God save the Queen.

Techman 27th Apr 2021 11:44 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Heatercathodeshort (Post 1368312)
The two prong fireglow lamps are pre war Berry's magicoal.

I had a good working one of these that I removed from an old electric fire at home when I was a youngster. I remember the fire being used and then I remember pulling it to bits and retrieving the orange two pin lamp. I think that the fire was taken out of use for a failed element. I remember the firework displays when they failed back then and the blob of melted wire that I seem to remember on the former of that particular fire element - I don't remember what happened to the lamp in the end, but I don't seem to have it now.

I used to have 60 watt orange lamps that were in a couple of wall lights in the house I used to live in over 20 years ago - they were still there and working when I moved, probably long gone by now!

However, seeing these orange and pink looking lamps seems to be ringing bells with me, so I need to have a look next time I'm in the loft to see what I can find - you never know!

rambo1152 28th Apr 2021 12:58 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
There were red or orange night lights in my boarding school dormitory.

Diabolical Artificer 28th Apr 2021 5:49 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I remember those from a bed warmer we had when I was a kid, the warmer was made of pressed sheet metal in a bar of soap type shape, my Mum slipped it under the sheets before I got in bed. This'd be early 70's before central heating.

Andy.

Refugee 28th Apr 2021 9:25 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I have got a pink bulb in storage and can remember testing it with a multimeter last time I spotted it.

electronicskip 28th Apr 2021 2:13 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Station X (Post 1368142)
Some lamps were specified as being "fire lamps" I remember Woolworths selling them in the early 1970's.

"Magicoal" seems to ring a bell regarding the electric fires they were used in.

We sold a lot of fireglow bulbs at the shop in various sizes and wattages , including multi coloured 15w Pygmy bulbs .
No particular dedicated use.

broadgage 28th Apr 2021 5:04 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Because orange or amber fireglow lamps were used in electric fires, there arose a widespread and erroneous belief that such lamps were "more warming" than other colours .
Use in electric bed warmers as described a few posts back was very common, when in fact a standard clear or pearl lamp would have worked just as well and been cheaper.

Red or orange lamps of low power were widely used as nightlights in school dormitories and similar places, minimum sleep disturbance but enough light to safely walk around if need be.

duncanlowe 28th Apr 2021 5:35 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
I hope this isn't drifting too far OT, but the mention of woolies in regards to lamps takes me back. I looked after the light fitting displays. On display, fittings were always equipped with 15W bulbs to avoid the big electricity bill from so many being in use. But the life was noticeably rubbish, so I was forever replacing them. Now I know we would have only been paying 'cost to the store' as they were treated as shrinkage. But I wonder if the significantly longer life of say 40W would actually have been cheaper? Might even have saved a bit of money on other heating for the store?

kellymarie 28th Apr 2021 6:54 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
My modern electric fire in the lounge has a white candle bulb which lights up a red faux coal and log effect the flame effect us done by an electric motor driving the wheel round

broadgage 28th Apr 2021 11:16 pm

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by duncanlowe (Post 1368983)
I hope this isn't drifting too far OT, but the mention of woolies in regards to lamps takes me back. I looked after the light fitting displays. On display, fittings were always equipped with 15W bulbs to avoid the big electricity bill from so many being in use. But the life was noticeably rubbish, so I was forever replacing them. Now I know we would have only been paying 'cost to the store' as they were treated as shrinkage. But I wonder if the significantly longer life of say 40W would actually have been cheaper? Might even have saved a bit of money on other heating for the store?

Use of a 15 watt bulb instead of a 40 watt bulb is of course saving 25 watts, or over 1000 hours is saving 25 KWH.

5 pence a unit was about the going rate for many years, so saving 25 KWH was saving about £1.25 in 1000 hours.
The lamps were probably about 10 pence each, cost price, not retail.
The electricity cost therefore exceeds the lamp cost.

And remember that the 15 watt lamps might well have lasted their 1000 hours.
If 100 lamps are lit for 12 hours a day, then at least half a dozen failures each week are to be expected.

steve102 29th Apr 2021 7:01 am

Re: Crompton 60W bulb
 
These bulbs are still available from https://www.lampwise.co.uk/crompton-...ight-bulb.html
I use one in my HMV fan heater instead of fireflow bulbs which tend to shed their red coating when warmed up.


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