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-   -   Liberon boiled linseed oil (https://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/showthread.php?t=178532)

baza100 4th Apr 2021 6:40 pm

Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hello, i have got my old sb3 bush radio already for applying the finish. I was thinking of using Liberon boiled linseed oil. when dry if needed was going to apply shilac. Would this be a good way to finish this radio? Thanks Barry

Scott5591 4th Apr 2021 8:32 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by baza100 (Post 1360477)
Hello, i have got my old sb3 bush radio already for applying the finish. I was thinking of using Liberon boiled linseed oil. when dry if needed was going to apply shilac. Would this be a good way to finish this radio? Thanks Barry

Liberon superior danish oil is good stuff. I’d do it outdoors though as it stinks.

Not recommended by most but I’ve also had good results just using woodsilk furniture polish. Spraying on a generous amount all over, waiting 5 minutes then wiping off the excess

Wellington 4th Apr 2021 10:36 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by baza100 (Post 1360477)
…when dry if needed was going to apply shilac. Would this be a good way to finish this radio?

I'm not sure that applying shellac over an oil finish would be a good idea. I wouldn't have thought it would stick. Don't know for sure, though - I've never tried it!

broadgage 5th Apr 2021 3:37 am

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
Please be careful if useing linseed oil.
Cloth dusters, tissue paper or other absorbent materials soaked with linseed oil are very liable to self heat and to then catch fire.

Any such items should be either destroyed by burning, or be placed in a METAL refuse bin, OUTDOORS, and well waway from flammables such as wooden outbuildings or dried vegetation.

Other oils can also be dangerous, but linseed oil is said to be particularly high risk.
Containers of the oil are relatively low risk, perhaps comparable to cooking oil.
Surfaces such as furniture or a radio case treated with the oil are low risk.
The danger is absorbent material soaked with the oil.

mark_in_manc 5th Apr 2021 7:33 am

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
I've been cautious with old rags from boiled linseed oil, but never seen so much as a smoulder... :)

I read a while back about a home-mix 'Danish' oil, which was a blend of boiled linseed (which has already had things done to it to persuade it to dry faster than raw linseed, which might not dry at all) and natural turpentine. I bought some of the latter - it smells nice. I suppose I ought to try it on something.

Craig Sawyers 5th Apr 2021 8:49 am

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
The difference between linseed oil, or tung oil, is that they do not include a drying agent. Of course old furniture that used an oil finish used linseed, leaving a piece for a week or more before applying another coat.

So it is necessary to leave something so coated for a long time in a dust-free environment.

Danish oil, by comparison, includes agents that means that a thin coat will dry in 24 hours. Several thin coats build a depth of finish.

Traditional shellac, made from the goop exuded from the lac beetle, is dissolved in ethyl alcohol. This seems not to be available in pure form any more, but mixed with a small amount of shellac it is called Finishing Spirit. Meths can also be used. Easily available in different colours (for example button for a dark finish or blode for a light one), either as raw material you make up yourself or as ready made up.

But the two finishes are not compatible. You cannot put shellac on top of an oil finish, or vice versa. You can put beeswax on top of either though.

And although I've used lots of Danish oil, I have never had an ignition problem, or so much as a puff of smoke from application rags (old cotton tee shirts etc are a good source of this; nothing synthetic or part synthetic for this)

Craig

PJL 5th Apr 2021 9:16 am

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
Boiled linseed oil and turpentine are often used as a cleaner on antique furniture but it is wiped off leaving only a thin layer. It is then OK to french polish.

fetteler 5th Apr 2021 11:07 am

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
Hi Barry,

I would just use shellac on its own. That's how the radio would have been finished originally.

Steve.

Lloyd 1985 5th Apr 2021 12:04 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
I’ve been experimenting with different finishes lately, most recent being Button Polish, which even with my crude attempts actually looks quite good! It’s hard work, it’s not something you can just slap on and walk away for a few hours and expect amazing results. It’s worth watching a few YouTube videos of it being done before trying it.

I’ve also tried Danish oil too, used it on a 1930’s mantle clock, it looks ok, came out more of a matt finish, and I also noticed it made some of the veneer shrink and begin to split. I don’t think I’ll use it for such things again, I think it’s better on solid wood, but others have had some really nice results from it.

By far the easiest finish is wax polishes, my own personal favourite being Briwax, available in different colours (or should I say, shades of brown!) and also clear. Dead easy to use, make sure the woods clean, then just rub some in with an old cloth, leave it for a few minutes then give it a good buffing, and repeat until the desired effect is achieved. One thing to note is that you can put wax onto other finishes, but I don’t think you’d be able to put other finishes on top of wax.

Then of course there are spray cans of lacquer or varnish, I’ve used Halfords branded clear lacquer on an old PYE radio before, which didn’t look too bad! Took a lot of sanding between coats to get it to look right though.

Regards
Lloyd

emeritus 5th Apr 2021 12:18 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
My understanding is that the danger of self-ignition of oily rags is real enough, but relates to them being crumpled up into a wad or pad in a confined space. When I have finished using a rag I always unfold it completely, spread it out and hang it up or drape it over the top of a piece of wood to expose all of its surface to the atmosphere. Like this I cannot see how any heat generated by decomposition could develop that would remotely approach ignition temperature.

Craig Sawyers 5th Apr 2021 12:56 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PJL (Post 1360628)
Boiled linseed oil and turpentine are often used as a cleaner on antique furniture but it is wiped off leaving only a thin layer. It is then OK to french polish.

I spent some months training to be an amateur cabinet maker some years ago. The guy I trained with mainly did furniture restoration, and part of this process was to remove possibly centuries of wax build up and general grot (usually smoke deposits from coal fires and smoking) in a sensitive way. He trained at the highly regarded courses at Oxford Brooks.

His recipe for cleaning he called "Magic Mix" being 30% meths, 30% white spirit, 30% Danish Oil and 10% vinegar.

The trick is not to scrub, but apply gently, looking at the colour of the rag very frequently. The meths will eventually soften any underlying french polish once the grot is removed and bring back it shine - if you scrub you'll actually take off the polish entirely.

But there are umpteen possible concoctions for this, and I can see turpentine (the real stuff, not turpentine substitute) being a good part of a restoration concoction.

Craig

PJL 5th Apr 2021 12:57 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
The vast majority of wood radios were sprayed with nitrocellulose lacquer as was most of the furniture of the period. You can still get it today in spray cans mostly because the guitar folks use it.

Uncle Bulgaria 5th Apr 2021 2:46 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
I believe Danish oil is a generic name for oil + varnish, so it both soaks into the wood and also provides a bit of sheen on the surface.

Linseed oil is great. I use it on just about all wood and like the finish a lot. It's very good for 'nourishing' woodwork (hence its use in putty and traditional paint), and in this respect is making a comeback against unsustainable plastic paints. Oh, and 'boiled' linseed oil is rarely that. If it is heated without air for a few days it becomes thicker and tougher, and cures faster. This is known as 'stand oil' and good quality linseed paints are made with this. Boiled linseed oil from the hardware shop refers to oil with metal driers added to approximate the faster curing of stand oil without the cost. As these driers are not the most pleasant, for anything that's near food you must remember to use pure linseed oil.

The spontaneous ignition is a real thing, but there will be no problem if the cloths are laid out to dry rather than being crumpled together. The original 'oilcloth', used for waterproof clothing and packaging, is linseed oil-soaked fabric left to polymerise in the sun, leaving a flexible, repairable coating.

I doubt wooden-cased radios were originally finished with linseed oil - I expect PJL knows what they're talking about and lacquer is the way to go if you want an original type of finish.

baza100 18th Apr 2021 6:43 pm

Re: Liberon boiled linseed oil
 
1 Attachment(s)
Thank you for all the replies In the end I went with Wilko Traditional Linseed Oil applied over several days. After dying for 4 days applied some Funiture wax and gave ita good buff up. I am pleased with the result, a natural finish not too shiny.

Thanks

Barry


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